MONOCULAR VISION-HINTS FOR THE CLASSROOM
RIGHT EYE IMPAIRED

A student that is blind in only one eye does not qualify, by law, as visually impaired.  However, the following suggestions may help you work with this student.

1.This student should be able to explain their eye condition to others.
2.Students with monocular vision are often prescribed glasses with polycarbonate lenses to protect the remaining eye from injury.  IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT THESE GLASSES ARE WORN AT ALL TIMES.
3.Students with monocular vision have a reduced visual field, even if the good eye has 20/20 vision.
4.Tasks that require depth perception may be frustrating for this student.  A student who acquires monocular vision adventitiously may trip over objects, run into doorways and have other depth perception problems until the brain adjusts and new skills are learned.
5.Games involving moving balls, depth perception, or accurate distance visual skills may present problems, depending upon the child.  Watch for sensitivity to glare in outdoor activities, particularly on bright days.  PLEASE GIVE THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER A COPY OF THIS LETTER!
6.This student has little or no vision in the right eye and should sit on the right side of the classroom to facilitate full use of the left eye. 
7.This student MAY have difficulty in keeping place while reading.
8.This student MAY have difficulty keeping the pencil on the line and monitoring the spacing of letters and words when learning how to write (dark-lined paper may help).
9.This student MAY have difficulty keeping track of space when copying from the blackboard or overhead projector.


MONOCULAR VISION-HINTS FOR THE CLASSROOM
LEFT EYE IMPAIRED

A student that is blind in only one eye does not qualify, by law, as visually impaired.  However, the following suggestions may help you work with this student.

1.This student should be able to explain their eye condition to others.
2.Students with monocular vision are often prescribed glasses with polycarbonate lenses to protect the remaining eye from injury.  IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT THESE GLASSES ARE WORN AT ALL TIMES.
3.Students with monocular vision have a reduced visual field, even if the good eye has 20/20 vision.
4.Tasks that require depth perception may be frustrating for this student.  A student who acquires monocular vision adventitiously may trip over objects, run into doorways and have other depth perception problems until the brain adjusts and new skills are learned.
5.Games involving moving balls, depth perception, or accurate distance visual skills may present problems, depending upon the child.  Watch for sensitivity to glare in outdoor activities, particularly on bright days.  PLEASE GIVE THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER A COPY OF THIS LETTER!
6.This student has little or no vision in the left eye and should sit on the left side of the classroom to facilitate full use of the right eye.
7.This student MAY have difficulty in keeping place while reading.
8.This student MAY have difficulty keeping the pencil on the line and monitoring the spacing of letters and words when learning how to write (dark-lined paper may help).
9.This student MAY have difficulty keeping track of space when copying from the blackboard or overhead projector.